PSY - Psychology Course Descriptions

PSY B9700 Special Topics in Psychology

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Approval of the appropriate faculty sponsor.

Contact Hours

Hrs. to be arranged

PSY B9800 Tutorial

May be taken twice for credit.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Approval of the appropriate faculty sponsor.

Contact Hours

Hrs. to be arranged

PSY B9900 Psychological Research and Seminar

Psychological research and seminar for candidates for the General M.A. degree who are engaged in thesis research. Offered each semester. Required for M.A. students on thesis track.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

Hrs. to be arranged

PSY 7000J History of Psychology

This course provides an overview of the history of psychology from ancient times to the present day. The aim of the course is to document the historical origins of the assumptions about science and psychology that shaped the development of twentieth century scientific psychology, and to identify conceptual continuities and discontinuities in the historical development of theories of human psychology and behavior.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7050J Statistical Methods in Psychology I

Statistics I focuses primarily on learning the conditions under which one would employ different statistical analyses, how to select the relevant analysis and how to analyze the data under study.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7060J Statistical Methods in Psychology II

Statistics II focuses on further development of statistical skills through advanced analyses of complex data sets.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 7050J

PSY 7113J Cognitive/Affective Aspects of Behavior

The course is designed to provide clinical graduate students in psychology with an overview of the history, theory, and measurement of human cognition and affect from a basic science perspective. The focus of this course will be the basic sciences of human cognition and emotion, how these two domains of human functioning can mutually influence each other, and how they can be harnessed to inform us about psychopathology.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7203J Lifespan Development

This course will focus on the development of the individual across the lifespan. Multiple strands come together across a range of developmental stages to create the individual, and thus, psychological development must always be seen in the context of an individual’s biology, her unique relational environment, her cognitive capacities, her social world, her community, and her culture.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7339J Research Practicum in Clinical Psychology

Advanced group supervision of research proposals with individual faculty.

Credits

3

PSY 7410J Psychoanalytic theories

This doctoral level course serves as an in depth introduction to the work of Sigmund Freud, using primary source material as well as supplemental texts. It will trace the development of the tenets of Freudian theory (i.e. the centrality of instincts and the hegemony of internal as opposed to external determinants of experience, the discovery of the unconscious and varied modes of representation, the primacy of memory in our apprehension of the present) and examine how current research and practice approach these areas.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7413J Transference and Counter transference

This doctoral level elective clinical/theoretical course will introduce advanced clinical psychology graduate students to the basic concepts relevant to understanding transference and counter transference processes in psychotherapy. The course offers a comprehensive introduction to these constructs, and an opportunity, within a case presentation format, to consider their impact within the context of ongoing clinical work.

Credits

3

PSY 7460J Social Psychology

This seminar provides a broad overview of social psychology, both classic and current. Social psychology has been described as “the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals” in the context of and shaped by “actual, imagined, or implied presence of others.”

Credits

3

PSY 7512J Biological Basis of Behavior

This course aims to provide an exposition of research and theory in the biological bases of normal and abnormal behavior. A survey of literature will span from nerve cells, the organization and functioning of the nervous system, to the neurobiological systems that underlie sensation, motor behavior, emotion, cognition, and self-other representation, and social behavior.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7550J Psychopathology I

The aim of this doctoral course is to introduce clinical psychology graduate students to the basic concepts relevant to understanding psychopathology in adult patients. The course examines the clinical, research, and theoretical literature of a range of Axis I and Axis II disorders including personality disorders, affective disorders and psychotic disorder.

Credits

3

PSY 7560J Psychopathology II

This course in Child Psychopathology is organized against the backdrop of 1) developmental factors, including level of emotional and cognitive/language functioning, capacities for affect and self-regulation, 2) risk factors, including biological, temperamental, neurodevelopmental, and genetic factors, as well as environmental factors such as parental psychopathology, family disruption, abuse, neglect, and other forms of trauma, 3) protective factors, and, finally, 4) cultural and other contextual factors.

Credits

3

PSY 7600J Psychometric Methods

Standardized measures are used across all areas of psychological research, and provide a critical lens through which we can observe human nature—from diagnostic to characterological, neurocognitive to unconscious, intellectual, social and cultural. This second course in the testing sequence exposes doctoral-level clinical psychology students to methods by which psychologists strive to conceptualize human behavior and individual differences in terms such as skills, aptitudes, attitudes, values, personality, and intelligence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 7661J

PSY 7611J Neuropsychological Assessment

This doctoral level course is the third in the diagnostic sequence and provides a broad overview of the assessment of the psychological and educational problems encountered by children with learning disabilities during their inevitably altered developmental trajectory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 7661J, PSY 7600J

PSY 7661J Psycho diagnostics

This is the first semester of a three-semester-long approach to the psychological understanding of adult and child patients through psychological testing. The methods of clinical inference and the purpose of synthesizing the inferences into a coherent portrait of someone will hopefully be of use throughout one’s professional career. It is certainly, both historically and heuristically, a hallmark of a clinical psychologist's training.

Credits

3

PSY 7770J Practicum in Interviewing and Personality Appraisal I

This course is designed to introduce clinical psychology doctoral graduate students to the psychodiagnostic and therapeutic skills of the practicing clinical psychologist. The focus will be on mastering the art of interviewing and the initial phases of clinical processes with an emphasis on the psychological evaluation and diagnosis of adult patients including an understanding of the multicultural context and social location of the patient.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7713J Ethical/Legal Issues for Psychologists

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to a comprehensive range of ethical and legal issues in the field of clinical psychology. We shall discuss various ethical systems in the history of western philosophy; bioethics; and research, clinical and professional ethics, as represented by the APA code of ethics.

Credits

3

PSY 7780J Practicum in Interviewing and Personality Appraisal II

The purpose of this course is to teach the essentials of child evaluation and assessment. These are real world skills that are critical in making decisions regarding treatment, school placement, testing, and medication, and involve developing your skills in parent interviewing, child play sessions, formulation, and diagnosis.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 7800J Quantitative Methods in Psychology

This doctoral course is designed to introduce graduate students in clinical psychology to the research process from the beginning to the end, while providing an overview of clinically relevant behavioral research method designs in psychology.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hrs./wk.

PSY 7900J Advanced Cognitive and Biological Bases of Behavior

An advanced course that integrates affective, biological and cognitive aspects and origins of behavior, all through a clinical lens.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 7113J and PSY 7512J

Contact Hours

3 hrs./wk.

PSY 8033J Doctoral dissertation seminar

This course is designed to support advanced graduate students in clinical psychology in the development of their dissertations. The course will review the research process, from defining a research population to disseminating findings. Additionally, the course will touch upon the key components of a research question, the fundamentals of research methodology, and research ethics. These skills are critical to becoming independent researchers.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8013J Seminar in special topics

This course number is reserved for the development and trial of new courses in the realm of clinical psychology and psychopathology.

Credits

3

PSY 8020J Independent psychological research

Independent study on a pre-dissertation research topic with core faculty member.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 7800J

PSY 8293J Evidence based assessment/treatment of addictive disorders

The aim of this doctoral course is to introduce clinical psychology graduate students to the basic concepts relevant to understanding the process of treatment for addictive behaviors. The course will review modern theoretical viewpoints of addictions including neurobiological, harm-reduction and stages of change models and contrast these with psychodynamic models of addiction.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 8500J

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8297J Integrative foundations of psychotherapy

The overall aim of the course is to develop an understanding of the way the key approaches to psychotherapy in our field have evolved, to evaluate their often unstated assumptions, their basis in clinical observation and systematic research, and their compatibilities and incompatibilities.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 8500J

PSY 8343J Sex and Gender

This course aims to address the determinants, development, and implications for mental and physical health and for positive adaptation of sex and gender identities. By the end of the course, the student should appreciate and understand the biopsychosocial factors underlying sex and gender, as well as the relations of those factors to health.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 8440J

PSY 8392J Therapeutic interventions: cognitive behavioral approaches

This course will introduce students to the assessment and cognitive-behavioral treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. Students will gain familiarity with the diagnostic criteria for mood and anxiety disorders using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fifth Edition (DSM-5) as well as semi-structured clinical interviews and self-report measures for these disorders. Students will learn about and gain skills in CBT case conceptualization, treatment planning and treatment implementation.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8398J Advanced Topics in Psychotherapy (Winnicott)

I think that a respectful way to approach Winnicott's work is to think dynamically, in the literal sense of the word. That is, to see his ideas as a presentation of paradoxes, never fully resolvable by words alone, yet capable of stirring us to find greater and deeper meanings to even the simplest of gestures and symbols. This course investigates his work in that context.

Credits

3

PSY 8410J Clinical Practicum I

This course is designed to help students to develop their skills as psychotherapists. We will work on the ongoing challenge of diagnosing adult patients (and utilizing diagnosis in treating them), and we will discuss progress and how to handle lack of progress with treatment plans.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8420J Clinical Practicum II

This is a practicum on working in therapy with children and adolescents Its aims are to: improve your ability to link diagnostic considerations to the process and content of your work with children; to better understand the meaning and nature of a child’s play, both in terms of its diagnostic meaning and in its link to developmental/cognitive considerations and to be better able to link work in the therapy room to work with parents and school personnel.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8440J Diversity issues in clinical psychology

This doctoral-level graduate course is designed to enhance the level at which clinical psychologists in training consider and discuss pertinent topics affecting the mental health of ethnic minority populations. Course material will focus largely on populations of African, Latino, and Asian descent, highlighting the variability that lies within these groups.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8441J Health of lesbians/gays/bisexuals

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals are a neglected segment of the population whose health has only recently been investigated systematically. The health of LGB individuals requires attention, given reports of poor mental and physical health. This course will examine the mental and physical health of LGB individuals.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 8440J

PSY 8500J Evidence based psychodynamic treatment

This doctoral level clinical course will focus on psychodynamic evidence based treatments. Students will be exposed to current evidence based treatment and assessment models for personality disorders, affective disorders and panic disorder.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8548J Supervision and consultation

This course is designed to equip advanced doctoral students with the fundamental theories, research, and techniques of clinical and academic supervision and consultation. Many graduates of our doctoral program include supervising and consulting as part of their careers. In addition, most find that after several years of absorbing clinical theories and practices as a student, the process of mentoring and guiding others in clinical and academic work and organizational change results in a next level of consolidation in the integration of theory, research, and practice.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY 8980J Research/clinical supervision

An independent study course regarding advanced integration of clinical and research endeavors with a core faculty member.

Credits

3

PSY 9000J Dissertation supervision

Upon attaining candidacy, students register for this course while completing their doctoral thesis.

Credits

3

PSY V0000 History of Psychology

The historical development of modern psychology. Among the topics to be considered are: (1) psychological problems as they developed in philosophy; (2) psychological problems as they developed in natural science; (3) the early psychological systematists; (4) modern schools of psychology.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V0100 Advanced Experimental Psychology I

Lectures deal with experimental methodology and research design, and with related problems such as the ethics of psychological experimentation. Laboratory work includes independent research, which may be conducted individually or by a group of students. Required for General Psychology M.A. students.

Credits

4

Contact Hours

2 lect., 4 lab. hr./wk.

PSY V0500 Statistical Methods in Psychology I

Probability and statistical inference; estimation of parameters in survey research; analysis of variance and designs for experimental research; correlation methods for psychometrics. Required for General Psychology M.A. and Ph.D. students.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

2 rec., 2 lab. hr./wk.

PSY V0600 Statistical Methods in Psychology II

A continuation of Psychology V0500. Also, multivariate analysis of correlation matrices and the use of computers for data analysis. Required for Ph.D. students.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

2 rec., 2 lab. hr./wk.

PSY V1000 Advanced Physiological Psychology

Considers the interrelation of structure and behavior of the organism, and the physiological background of various psychological processes. The structure and function of the nervous system are surveyed. Various problems relating to the concept of "reflex," the organization, development and coordination of motor activities, and the physiological basis of emotions are discussed in detail.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr/wk.

PSY V1200 An Introduction to Neuropsychology

This course provides an overview of the field of neuropsychology, focusing on what is known about the functional organization of brain systems. No prior knowledge of psychophysiology or cognition is required but would be helpful.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V1402 Psychopharmacology

Science of drugs and their actions. Study of neuronal membranes and potentials, synaptic communication, neurotransmitters, receptor pharmacology, brain chemical circuits, neuroendocrine systems, hormones and neuropeptides. Primary is the goal of providing mental health professionals with a core knowledge of the biological bases and treatment of individuals with mental and addictive disorders.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V2000 Developmental Psychology I

The development of children, from infancy to adolescence, will be discussed from a wide variety of theoretical perspectives, including Piagetian, psychoanalytic, behavioral, and cross-cultural viewpoints.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V2500 Developmental Psychology II

Psychology of maturity, with emphasis on the later years. Social and cultural determinants of aging. Age-related changes in biological structure and function, perceptual processes, psychomotor skills, cognition, learning, and memory. Emotional and social adjustment during the later years. Maintaining the effectiveness of the older adult.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V3000 Psychology of Learning

Analysis of contemporary researchand theory in the area of behavior modification.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V3300 Psychological Aspects of Learning Disabilities

This course provides a broad overview of the psychological and educational problems encountered by children and adults with learning disabilities during their inevitably altered developmental trajectory. While it is not a course in the neuropsychology of learning disabilities, some background is essential and will be covered in the presentation of the three syndromes to be covered. These syndromes are: 1) developmental language disorders, 2) attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and 3) right hemisphere learning disorders. Diagnosis and evaluation are a central component of the course, and a case presentation format is used to flesh out our understanding of each disorder.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Doctoral Students must have completed at least one semester of Diagnostic Testing.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V3500 Psychology of Perception

This course reviews basic psychophysics, psychophysiology and signal detection theory before an in-depth study primarily of vision and audition, with some comparisons from the touch systems and small and taste. Examination of the visual system will comprise both modern structuralist receptive field approaches and behavioral approaches from the Gestalt psychologists through Gibson and visual scene building and attention. Classes are primarily lecture and demonstration.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V3800 Psychology of Cognition

Cognitive Psychology is the study of human thinking from behavioral, artificial intelligence and neuropsychological perspectives. The course touches on neural basics and brain organization, to focus on pattern recognition, attention, memory, imagery, language and problem-solving processes. Research in these areas to be reviewed will come from classic cognitive behavioral studies, neuroimaging studies and computer modeling studies.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V4200 Health Psychology

This course is an introduction to health psychology. Health psychology brings the corpus of psychological knowledge to bear on understanding physical health. Many prevalent diseases are under the control of the individual both in terms of risk behaviors elevating the probability of disease and with respect to adherence to health promoting behaviors or treatment regimens that aim to control, reduce, or eliminate the disease cause agents. Health psychology is concerned with understanding the psycho-behavioral factors that explain physical disease. It also focuses on designing, implementing, and evaluating preventive interventions to reduce or eliminate the behaviors that place the individual at risk for poor health.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 70500.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V4300 Positive Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of optimal human functioning. Focus is on the factors that allow individuals and communities to thrive. In this course, students will critically assess primary readings in the field, covering topics such as optimism, happiness, resilience, spirituality, wisdom, and positive emotions.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Master's level Statistics or Experimental Psychology or permission from the instructor.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V4600 Advanced Social Psychology

This course introduces students to occupational health psychology (OHP). OHP involves the application of psychology to the study of the relation of the work organization to the physical and mental health and well-being of individual who work. The primary focus of OHP is the relation of ill health by creating healthy work environments.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V4700 Epidemiology of Mental Disorders

The course introduces students to research on the distribution of mental disorders and their causes in different populations. The course covers basic epidemiological indices of risk, the measurement in mental disorder (reliability, validity), prevalence estimates, and research on the causes of selected disorders.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 21500 AND PSY 32100 OR equivalent undergraduate Statistics and Research Methods courses.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V4800 Work, Stress, and Health

This course introduces students to occupational health psychology (OHP). OHP involves the application of psychology to the study of the relation of the work organization to the physical and mental health and well-being of individuals who work. The primary focus of OHP is the prevention of ill health by creating healthy work environments.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate courses in statistics and experimental psychology.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V5200 Psychology of Language

What is language, is it unique to humans conferring special cognitive power to us, and how is it shaped by human social, perceptual, and cognitive constraints? What role does biology play in shaping language structure? This course explores basic linguistic issues in semantics, syntax, phonology, language acquisition, literacy and pragmatics, and the cognitive processes underlying them. In addition, we look at sociolinguistics, bilingualism, secondary language processes, and second language reading and writing. While considering the neural underpinnings and nativist hypotheses, we also strongly emphasize the role of social processes in constructing meaning, in language and literacy acquisition, and in language change.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr/wk.

PSY V5500 Psychopathology I

Covers the entire field of clinical expression of psychodynamics of the total personality as demonstrated in various forms of the psychoses and neuroses. It stresses the evolution of modern psychiatric thought. It is substantially supported by demonstrations of patients at a psychiatric hospital and clinic. The course stresses the functional psychoses.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V5650 Gender and Psychopathology

The course will focus on theories and findings related to why specific psychological disorders tend to be much more prevalent among women and others tend to be much more prevalent among men. Readings will include theoretical work on gender, studies of the methodology used in relating gender and psychopathology, and research on the connection between gender and particular disorders, including perhaps depression, some anxiety disorders, disordered eating, autism, and conduct disorder.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V5700 Biological Basis of Behavior

This course aims to provide an exposition of research and theory in the biological bases of normal and abnormal behavior. A survey of literature will span from nerve cells, the organization and functioning of the nervous system, to the neurobiological systems that underlie sensation, motor behavior, emotion, cognition, and self-other representation, and social behavior. The course also integrates understanding of altered behavioral processes of brain-damaged and psychiatric patients with knowledge of basic neuronal and neurobiological processes.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V5800 The Health of LGB Individuals

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals are a neglected segment of the population whose health has only recently been investigated systematically, and who may be at greater risk for poor mental and physical health. We will examine theories and consider sociodemographic characteristics to help students develop a solid grasp of the biopsychosocial exigencies and health of LGB individuals.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6100 Measurement of Abilities

Topics covered include the psychometric principles of testing and assessment, with an emphasis upon intelligence testing and the measurement of cognitive abilities. Hands-on experience with psychodiagnostic tests in a workshop format is an integral part of the course.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

2 lect., 2 lab. hr./wk.

PSY V6532 Theories and Techniques of Counseling

Theoretical foundations of major contemporary approaches to counseling and psychotherapy and their applications are critically examined. Basic counseling skills are developed through lectures, demonstrations, small-group discussions and experiential activities.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6540 Trauma and Resilience

This graduate level course offers the student a comprehensive exploration of the psychological trauma field, including its history, current theories, the nature of trauma (e.g., sexual violence, armed conflict, and natural disasters), how trauma affects individual and systems, grief reactions and traumatic stress. Students will develop a foundation for assessing and treating post trauma reactions in children, adolescents and adults.


Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6556 Group Dynamics and Group Counseling

This course provides the essential knowledge and skills necessary for understanding, organizing, and working with groups within the counseling field. Students gain knowledge and competencies in these areas through a combination of traditional didactics and optional participation in an in-class personal growth group.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6560 Multicultural Issues in Counseling

An introduction to the role of political and socio-cultural factors such as ethnicity, race, social class, religion, gender, and age in the delivery of culturally relevant and psychologically appropriate mental health services. Students develop the appropriate skills relevant to working with diverse communities in the United States.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6563 Research and Program Evaluation

This course reviews the fundamentals of research methods and evaluation methods. Students are introduced to some aspects of evaluation theory, basic research methods used in applied research and evaluation, and to practical approaches to conducting and interpreting research. Students are introduced to research design and assessing program implementation. Students are expected to apply previous statistics and introductory research methods course content.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6564 Psychoeducational and Community Interventions

This course is designed to provide students with the fundamental concepts and skills needed to create, evaluate, and disseminate prevention-oriented programs in communities. Students learn how to utilize qualitative and quantitative research, along with the interpersonal skills and sensitivity to diversity issues needed to implement and sustain community programs.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6575 Assessment and Appraisal of Individuals, Couples, Families and Groups

The interview is the core technique for conducting a thorough clinical assessment that includes a diagnosis and formulation as well as an assessment of the clients' resources and strengths, and is the first step in creating a therapeutic relationship. In this course, students hone their interviewing and assessment skills.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6582 Counseling Adolescents

Adolescent counseling is examined with emphasis on the issues unique to their stage of life. These include pubertal development, cognitive development, identity, dating and sexuality, family, peer relationships, school, and work all within a multicultural context.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6583 Recognition and Reporting of Child Abuse

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize signs and symptoms of physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse, and neglect. Students acquire knowledge of the ethical and legal issues pertinent to the role of counselors, and the required steps for reporting child abuse.

Credits

1

Contact Hours

1 hr./wk.

PSY V6584 Professional Orientation and Ethics

This course provides knowledge of the ethical, legal, and professional standards relevant to the counseling field. It provides an overview of the history of the counseling field and an introduction to the roles, responsibilities, and identity of the professional counselor. Professional organizations, preparation and credentialing are addressed.

Credits

2

Contact Hours

2 hr./wk.

PSY V6587 Clinical Instruction

This course introduces students to the assessment and diagnosis of mood and anxiety disorders and evidence-based treatments for these disorders. Students learn how to administer the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and reliable self-report measures. Students learn how to conceptualize and treat cases utilizing a Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment model.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6589 Practicum in Counseling I

Students serve as counselors-in-training at pre-arranged practicum sites providing an integration of on-site counseling experiences with theories, treatment interventions, and legal/ethical issues learned in previous courses. Site and department supervisors provide formal evaluations of students' performance upon completion of the practicum experience.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6590 Practicum in Counseling II

Students serve as counselors-in-training at pre-arranged practicum sites providing an integration of on-site counseling experiences with theories, treatment interventions, and legal/ethical issues learned in previous courses. Site and department supervisors provide formal evaluations of students' performance upon completion of the practicum experience.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6591 Lifestyle and Career Development

This course examines the major theories of career development. The course examines the effect of depression, anxiety and substance abuse in a work environment. The effects of ethnicity, socio-economic status, age, gender and sexual orientation on career development are also examined.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6593 Family and Couples Counseling

The capacities and difficulties of individuals are best understood in context of family functioning, and the broader systems within which families exist. This course covers the major approaches to family and couples therapy, including theories and research on family organization, affect and communication, development, culture, problem formation, resilience, and intervention.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6594 Family and Couples Counseling II

This course provides an introduction to empirically-based practices (EBPs) in the field of family and couple therapy and counseling. It will cover the history of the development of EBPs, the scientific methods used to establish a treatment as empirically-based, assessment strategies, and empirically-based therapeutic techniques.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6597 Foundations of Mental Health Counseling and Consultation

Prepares students in essential clinical and professional competencies. Students gain further experience with Psychodynamic, Person-Centered, Cognitive-Behavioral, and other approaches through readings and working with videotaped demonstrations, and in-class exercises with client cases from a wide range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Special emphasis is given to suicide assessment and intervention, professional ethics and HIPAA requirements.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6600 Practicum in CASAC Counseling

This practicum consists of a semester of supervised counseling experience in which students serve as CASAC counselors-in-training at approved practicum sites. Students perform 300 clock hours, including at least 120 direct service hours. Students will receive one hour weekly of face-to-face supervision with a qualified site supervisor, plus in-class supervision with the course instructor.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PSY 10200 and PSY 21500 and PSY 32100 and PSY 35000 and PSY 36000 and PSY 36300 and PSY 36700 and PSY 37000 and PSY 38000 and PSY V5700 and PSY V6593 and PSY V7000 and PSY V7100 and PSY V0500 and permission of Department.

Corequisites

PSY V0100

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V6602 Theories of Individual Psychotherapy

Theories of individual psychotherapy from behavioral, client centered, cognitive, gestalt, existential and psychoanalytical perspectives are contrasted using written materials and films. The central place of value and cultural perspective is emphasized.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V7000 Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Diagnosis and Treatment

Examines the stages and processes of addiction to alcohol and other drugs from the initiation of substance use through abuse and dependence, to treatment, recovery, and relapse prevention. Primary focus is on theories and techniques of substance abuse treatment. The range of treatment settings and services are examined for their relative benefits and limitations in treatment. Overview of short-term and long-term effects of major categories of abused drugs on abuser and community.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V7100 Chemical Dependency and Mental Health

This course aims to help students to understand the challenges to mental health caused by chemical dependency. A particular focus of the course will be on the concept of "dual diagnosis" and how it affects treatment. A number of specific (especially behavioral) techniques for the treatment of chemical dependency is examined.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate courses in substance abuse and/or abnormal psychology.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

PSY V7500 Psychopathology of Childhood

An introductory course designed to explore issues of normal and pathological emotional development during the school age years. Review of basic psychoanalytic notions of development during this period; classical analytic as well as object relations in attachment theories will be discussed. A number of specific syndromes and their possible etiologies; depression, additional situational disturbances, personality disorder, borderline syndromes and childhood schizophrenia are also reviewed. Discussion of major diagnostic classifications systems, including DSM-III and the GAP manual.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.