ME - Mechanical Engineering Course Descriptions

ME G0000 Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering

Advanced topics selected for their timeliness and current interest.

Credits

Variable cr.

ME G0400 Industry Oriented Design Project

Credits

ME G0500 Mechanical Vibratns

Mechanical Vibratns

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME G0600 Thermal Systems Design

Therml Syst Designs


Credits

3

Contact Hours

Therml Syst Designs

ME G2300 Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

Htng-Vent-Air Cond


Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME G3300 Solar Energy

Solar Energy

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME G4300 Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics

Non-Newt Fluid Mech


Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME G4900 Advanced Topics in Fluid Dynamics

Advanced Topics in Fluid Dynamics


Credits

ME G5100 Vehicular Power Systems

Vehicular Power Systems


Credits

ME I0000 Seminars

Recent developments in mechanical engineering and related fields; economic and social effects. The students report on assigned subjects.

Credits

Variable cr.

Prerequisites

Departmental approval.

ME I0100 Introduction to Research

This course will introduce PhD students into developing skills and knowledge in research tools and methods, safety and ethics in research, technical research writing, professional communications and critical thinking. The students will be required to apprentice in various research laboratories in the department, familiarize themselves with the ongoing research and write reports with critical view of the research topics.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Enrollment in Mechanical Engineering PhD program.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I0200 Applied Fluid Mechanics

This course presents the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with a balance between, physics, mathematics and applications. It includes application of conservation laws in control volumes with moving boundaries in tensor notation, high medium and low Reynolds number flows, momentum integrals in boundary layers, jets and wakes. Also described adiabatic frictional flows, flows with heat addition and energy related issues. Final project.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate fluid mechanics ME 35600 or equivalent with departmental approval, symbolic language Matlab.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I0390 Solar Energy Engineering

This course studies the fundamentals of solar radiation, its measurement methods and estimation. Selected topics in heat transfer relevant to systems design applications of solar energy such as flat plate and focusing collectors, energy storage systems, heating and cooling systems, power generation systems and distillation processes. Principles of Photovoltaic systems design for direct conversion of solar energy to electricity.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate heat transfer ME 43000 or equivalent with departmental approval; symbolic language Matlab or EES.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I1700 Finite Element Methods

Equilibrium and energy based formulations of the finite element method. Review of the direct stiffness method. Truss, beam, plane and three dimensional element formulations, including isoparametric elements. Static and transient response of structures with applications in solid mechanics. Students are expected to use the available workstations to complete a project.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Departmental permission.

Corequisites

None

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I3100 Steam and Gas Turbines

Classification of modern turbomachines. Concepts in applied thermo-fluid mechanics. Similarity in design; wind tunnels and cascade of aerofoils; loss mechanisms; radial equilibrium theory; performance prediction; erosion and high temperature problems; instrumentation.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 33000, ME 35600.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I3400 Advanced Heat Transfer

Conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy. Conduction with energy generation, transpiration cooling, and phase transformation. Boundary layer approximations. Laminar heat transfer from flat plates and tubes. Heat transfer in free convection. Turbulent flow heat transfer.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Students are required to have previous knowledge of ME 43300 or ChE 34200 or equivalent and ENGR I1100 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I3600 Conduction Heat Transfer

Formulation of the basic governing equations in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Consideration of linear and nonlinear problems. Topics include: conduction with energy generation, transpiration cooling, conduction in non-stationary systems, phase transformation, and ablation. Exact analytic solutions. Application of the integral method.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39200 and ME 43300 or CHE 34200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I3700 Convection Heat Transfer

Conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy. Boundary layer approximations. Laminar heat transfer from flat plates and tubes. Heat transfer in free convection. Turbulent flow heat transfer. Boiling and condensation. Heat exchanger theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 43300 or ChE 34200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./ wk.

ME I4200 Applied Stress Analysis

Linear elastic theory of solid mechanics. Includes concepts of stress and strain, governing equations of linear elastic theory, setup of boundary value problem, and two dimensional examples. Stress analysis of structural members. Includes failure criteria of materials, yielding, fracture and fatigue; Prandtle Torsion theory, torsion of thin walled structure; Bending of asymmetric beams and curved beam; and Energy methods for structural members and general solids.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Mechanics of Materials ME 33000 or equivalent with departmental permission.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4400 Nano/Micromechanics

Nano/Micromechanics encompass mechanics related to nano- and micro-structures of materials. In this course, the introduction to nano-scale science will be given first. Then the existing methods used to study nanomechanics of materials and the current research status on nanomechanics will be presented. In contrast to nanomechanics, micromechanics theory has been better developed. Green's function and Eshelby's solution of an ellipsoidal inclusion will be introduced first. Then the variety methods including self-consistent method, generalized self-consistent scheme, Mori-Tanaka's method, and differential scheme will be studied. Finally, a hierarchical approach from nano- to micro- to meso- to macro-scale will be discussed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate mechanics of materials ME 33000 or equivalent with departmental permission; symbolic language Matlab.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4500 Mechanics and Physics of Solids

A survey course covering several topics in solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials. Combines the experimental observations, underlying physical mechanisms and mathematical models. The measurable mechanical properties are discussed in the content of specific mechanics models. The topics include elastic deformation and stress, thermal stress, vibration, wave propagation, plasticity, fracture, fatigue, and linear viscoelasticity.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Mechanics of Materials ME 33000 or equivalent with departmental permission.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4600 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Governing equation and models of fluid flow and heat transfer; basic numerical techniques for solution; estimation of accuracy and stability of the numerical approximations; boundary conditions; grid generation; structure and performance of commercial software for applications in analysis and design of thermo-fluid systems; Final project.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate fluid mechanics ME 35600 or equivalent with departmental permission; Introduction to Numerical Method I1500.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4700 Physical Properties of Materials

In this course, we first discuss the equilibrium properties of crystals such as permittivity, piezoelectricity, elasticity etc. The essential mathematical formula such as tensor and matrix notations will be used to describe the fundamental physical properties of materials. The focus of the course is to introduce the students with a broader view on all physical properties of materials including mechanical, electric, thermal and magnetic properties and their coupling behaviors based on the structure and symmetry of the material. Also the transport properties will be introduced at the end of the class. Some basic principles of transport phenomena and irreversible thermodynamics will be briefly introduced. Hopefully this course will provide the essential mathematical framework for the constitutive relations of the material.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Under graduate mechanics of materials ME 33000 & Engineering Materials ME 46100 or equivalent with departmental permission.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4800 Accidental Injury Biomechanics

In this course the principles of mechanics and/or biomechanics are used to understand how accidental injuries happen. The topics covered in this course are: biomechanics of human body and injuries including head, spine, abdominal and extremities; injury classification criteria; methods in trauma biomechanics such as: accident reconstruction, experimental and numerical methods; automotive accidental injuries and restrain systems; sport injuries; slip and fall injuries; safety standards; ergonomics and human factor; human body dynamics; and accident prevention. In addition, automotive safety features will be discussed.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate ME 47200 or equivalent, ME 37100 or equivalent, ME 33000 or equivalent with departmental permission. Knowledge of CAD/FE software is also required.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I4900 Vehicle Safety Design and Biomechanics

In this course, the state-of-the-art and new technologies and design changes in all types of vehicles, and in particular automotive industry, that are geared towards safety issues and injury prevention of occupants will be discussed. Specifically, the topics of the course are: Vehicle body design; crash worthiness of the body; stability of vehicles; restraint system and supplemental restraint systems such as seat belts, pre-tensioner and airbags; crash sensors; seat and interior safety; occupant protection systems; codes and FMVSS standards; NHTSA standards and crash tests; simulation and accident reconstruction; biomechanics of occupant kinematics; brief anatomy; injury classification; and mechanisms of occupant injuries. The students are required to design and analyze a safety feature of a vehicle.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate ME 47200 or equivalent, ME 37100 or equivalent, ME 33000 or equivalent with departmental permission. Knowledge of CAD/FE software is also required.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I5000 Advanced Computational Fluid Mechanics

Theory of finite element methods, Iterative solution methods, High-performance computing, Solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (Projection methods, artificial compressibility methods, penalty methods, DAE), Applications in heat and fluid dynamics (in 1D and 2D), Final project.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Computational Fluid Mechanics ME G4600 or equivalent with departmental permission; Introduction to Numerical Method ME I1500.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I5200 Applied Plasticity

Theory of viscoelasticity with applications to vibrations and buckling. Introduction to the theory of plasticity Physical basis, yield conditions. Perfectly plastic and strain hardening materials. Druckers's postulates, flow rule. Upper and lower bound theorems. Applications to torsion, indentation and plate theory. Numerical solutions.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Departmental permission.

Corequisites

None.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I5400 Adv Stress Analysis

Adv Stress Analysis

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I5800 Trajectories and Orbits

Kepler's laws. The central force field. Ballistic trajectories. Minimum energy orbital transfer. Earth orbits and orbital parameters. Hohmann transfer. Two body and many body problems. Consideration of translunar trajectories and deep space problems.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 24700 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6100 Wind Energy Fundamentals and Applications

In this course we consider the wind resources to extract energy. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are developed based on classical blade momentum theory and on numerical solutions of advanced transport equations. Betz limit is discussed and innovative concepts are described to illustrate principles. Advanced topics are presented including resource assessment, wake, losses and uncertainties. Term project is assigned involving the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics to evaluate wind turbine systems.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Undergraduate fluid mechanics Or equivalent with departmental approval; symbolic language matlab.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk

ME I6200 Mechanical Vibration

This course is the first course in Mechanical Vibration and includes developing equations for a single-degree-of-freedom system [SDOF] model based on concepts such as equivalent mass, stiffness and damping. Laplace transform approach is used to obtain response due to initial conditions, sinusoidal forced or base excitation and rotating unbalance. Vibrations under general forcing functions such as periodic inputs and nonperiodic inputs also studied using frequency response function and convolution integral respectively. Above mentioned approaches are modified and used to investigate multi-degree-of-freedom system (MDOF). Modal analysis is introduced to find natural frequencies and mode shapes. As an application of MDOF un-damped and damped vibration absorbers are introduced to reduce resonant vibrations. The use of MATLAB software in vibration analysis is emphasized.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk

ME I6400 Wave Propagation in Solids

Hyperbolic and dispersive, linear and non-linear waves. Hyperbolic waves: the wave equations, stationary waves, breaking waves. Dispersive waves: dispersion relations, group and phase velocities. Non-linear waves and chaos in wave fields. Stress waves in solids (dilation and distortion waves, Rayleigh waves).

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Department permission.

Corequisites

None.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6500 Computer Aided Design

Computer aided engineering design methodology; components of hardware, software and the use of commercial CAD systems in mechanical engineering design. Basic concepts of CAD and engineering analysis. Pro-Engineering Analysis Code; Splines and Coon's surfaces; geometric and wire frame modeling techniques. Simulation and modeling of an engineering problem; engineering assumptions. Introduction to finite element methods; mesh generation; simulation of loadings, and boundary conditions. Postprocessing and evaluation of results. Applications of these concepts to specific engineering design projects.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 14500, ME 33000, ME 47200 (or equivalent), MATH 39200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6600 Boundary Element Method

Boundary Integral Equations. Green's functions and influence functions for one, two, and three dimensional problems. BE formulation for Laplacian, Poisson and biharmonic equations. Shape functions. Integration over element. Numerical formulation of the BE. Direct and indirect BE methods. BE solutions to Potential flow, torsion and heat transfer problems. Time dependent problems. Elastostatic, plane and Plate problems. Special Green's functions.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6700 Composite Materials

Introduction, definition and classification of composites. Manufacturing, applications and advantages of composites. Macromechanics of a lamina. Anisotropic stress-strain relations. Strength and stiffness. Experimental determination of strength and stiffness properties. Failure theories. Stiffness and strength prediction theories. Classical lamination theory. Symmetric, anti-symmetric and non-symmetric laminates. Failure analysis of laminates. Interlaminar stresses, delamination, joining of composites; adhesively bonded joints. Structural applications.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 33000 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6800 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

This course is built around a concrete mechanical system, for example, the pendulum. Definition of dynamical systems, phase space flows and invariant subspaces. Local and global bifurcation theory: Saddle-node, transcritical, pitchfork, and Hopf bifurcations, sability of homoclinic orbits, center manifolds and normal forms. Chaos: fractal geometry and dimension, Lyapunov exponents, routes to chaos (period doubling, quasi-periodicity, intemittency), spatio-temporal chaos.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39100 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I6900 Experimental Methods in Fluid Mechanics & Combustion

Introduction to fundamental concepts of experimentation: Error analysis, accuracy and precision. Analog to digital conversion. Sampling considerations. Data reduction. Time series analysis. Dynamical processes, Spectral and correlation functions. Probability and statistical variance. Engineering use of statistical averages. Frequency response and spatial resolution. Flow visualization techniques. Image processing. Particle Image Velocimetry. Laser Doppler and hot wire anemometry. Laser diagnostics in combustion. Spectroscopy and chromatography. Mie and Raman scattering. Laboratory demonstrations and hands-on experience with several modern techniques.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ME I9700 Report

In-depth analysis of a specific topic by means of a written report using a number of technical papers, reports or articles as references. Topic to be chosen by student in consultation with a professor.

Credits

0

Prerequisites

Completion of 12 credits toward the master's degree in Mechanical Engineering.

ME I9800 Project

Theoretical or experimental project under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Student submits a written proposal, performs the required work, and submits a written final report.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Written departmental approval.

ME I9900 Research for the Master's Thesis

Credits

6

ME J9900 Research for the Doctoral Dissertation

Credits

Variable cr. (Up to 12 cr.)

ME K9000 Doctoral Dissertation Supervision

1 credit repeatable up to 6 credits.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Approval of the departmental Ph.D. advisor.