ENGR - Engineering Graduate Courses

ENGR G0000 Selected Topics in Engineering

Advanced topics in engineering chosen for their current interest to graduate students.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Departmental approval.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR G5200 Nuclear Reactor Physics and Engineering

Credits

ENGR G5300 Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics

Credits

ENGR G5600 Nuclear Reactor Design, Operation and Safety

Credits

ENGR G6601 Environmental Modeling for Earth Systems Sciences and Engineering

Nature and purpose of environmental modeling; definition of fundamental concepts in environmental modeling; mathematical and numerical concepts involved in designing and building an environmental model; calibration, verification and validation of models; scale dependency; sensitivity analysis; characteristics, architecture and functioning of selected environmental models; practice by code development and use; contemporary applications to water resources, atmospheric processes, and climate dynamics processes.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Graduate student standing in ESEST and a suitable GIS Introductory Course.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR G6610 Independent Study

Individual laboratory work,field work, or study in Earth Systems and Environmental Engineering under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Up to 3 cr. can be applied to Master’s degree. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Graduate student standing in ESEE. Permission of instructor.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR H3800 Management Concepts for Engineers

An analysis of the basic concepts of planning, leading, controlling and organizing in a high technology environment is presented. Topics include: developing team based organizations, improving communications and interpersonal relations, engineering ethics, decision-making techniques, handling conflicts and effective time management, motivating workforces and developing leadership style.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR H7600 Engineering and Business Law

Environmental law (E.L.) and Contract law (C.L.) are major components. The E.L. portion deals with salient features, particularly important to engineers, of the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The C.L. portion deals with engineers' liabilities, contracts and breaches thereof, bids, bonds, subcontracts, assignments, extra work disputes and arbitration.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR H8000 Decision and Planning Techniques for Engineering Management

Application of quantitative decision and planning tools to the problems of engineering management. Probability concepts. Decision making using probabilities. Inventory management and Just-In-Time tactics. Linear programming for optimal planning. Transportation and assignment problems. Job Shop scheduling. PERT/CPM and project management. Waiting lines. Statistical concepts with applications to quality control. Reliability analysis and maintenance strategy.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR H8500 Project Management

The practical aspects of total engineering project management are discussed and a functional approach for present and future project managers to assure project performance is presented. The course emphasizes the key role of project managers to assure project completion on time and within cost and quality requirements. Techniques of project planning, budgeting, contracting and control are emphasized.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR H9300 Economics and Investment Analysis of Engineering Projects

The practical aspects of economic analysis of engineering projects and their salient investment features. It includes relevant aspects of basic engineering economics and factors affecting project investment decisions. Value of money, present worth and rate of return concepts will be examined. Use of these concepts in project decisions and consideration of alternatives will be discussed. Examples will be taken from state-of-the-art electrical engineering industries.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I0000 Seminars

Recent developments in engineering. The students report on assigned subjects.

Credits

Credit varies.

Prerequisites

Departmental approval.

ENGR I0600 Applied Algebra

The fundamentals of topics from algebra that are important in system theory, control theory, network theory and computer science. The topics include set theory, rings, groups, finite-dimensional vector spaces, matrices, Boolean algebra and linear graphs.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I0800 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics I

Extensive physical background; introduction to basic theorems and concepts. Application of vector calculus and tensor analysis to inviscid and viscous steady and unsteady flow. Navier-Stokes equations and Prandtl boundary layer theory; application to in-compressible fluid motions.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 35600 or CHE 34200 or CE 35000.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I0900 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics II

General theory of compressible, steady and unsteady flows, theory of characteristics. Linear and nonlinear wave propagation. Hypersonic flow.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I0800.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1100 Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Function of matrices, application to systems of ordinary differential and difference equations. Definitions and basic properties of Legendre, Bessel, and other special functions. Common problems in partial differential equations and solution by separation of variables. Eigenfunction expansions. Fourier integral. Applications of Laplace and Fourier transforms.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1200 Functions of a Complex Variable

The elementary functions and their geometric representation. Cauchy integral theorems, Taylor and Laurent series. Classification of singularities. Analytic continuation, multivalued functions and their Riemann surfaces. Conformal mapping, Laplace and Fourier transforms and their inversion. Causality conditions, Nyquist criterion, Wiener-Hopf problems.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1300 Transform Methods in Engineering

Elements of analytic function theory: contour integration, residue theorem. Laplace, Fourier, Mellin, Hankel, Hilbert and other common transforms. Properties, inversion formulas. Applications to the solution of ordinary differential equations, integral and dual integral equations and various problems in elasticity, vibrations, and fluid mechanics.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1400 Applied Partial Differential Equations

Inhomogeneous boundary value problems and solution by separation of variables. First order equations and their solution by characteristics. Higher order equations and systems, classification by characteristics. Hyperbolic equations and systems. The Riemann function, propagation of discontinuities and shocks. Boundary value problem for elliptic equations, maximum principle, Green's function. Potential theory, reduction of boundary value problem to an integral equation. Introduction to regular and singular perturbation solutions of non-linear equations.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1500 Introduction to Numerical Methods

Computation of roots of algebraic and transcendental equations. Solution of simultaneous equations. Determinations of eigenvalues. Interpolation. Approximation of functions by polynomials. Integration. Solution of ordinary differential equations.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CSC 10200, MATH 39200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1600 Advanced Numerical Analysis

Numerical solutions of problem in science and engineering. Linear and nonlinear systems of algebraic equations. Sparse matrix techniques. Eigenvalue-eigenvector problems. Error analysis. Nonlinear initial value problems and two-point boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations. Analysis of stability and accuracy. Least squares problems, approximation with sine functions, function minimization. Students are expected to use available work stations.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1500.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I1700 Finite Element Methods in Engineering

Equilibrium and variational formulations of finite element methods. Plane, axisymmetric, and shell elements. Isoparametric elements. Static and transient response of structures. Applications in potential flow, electrostatic, thermal conduction field problems, and diffusion equations. Students are expected to use available work stations.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MATH 39200, CE I5400, or home department advisor's approval.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I2000 Random Processes in Engineering Mechanics

Introduction to probability theory. Random processes: ergodic, stationary and non-stationary processes. Autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions, power and cross spectra, correlation coefficients. Input-output relationships for linear and nonlinear oscillators. Discrete and continuous systems. Zero-crossing and up-crossing problem. Stochastic characteristics of maximum response. Applications to vibrations, earthquake and wind engineering.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100 and CE 59802 or ME 54200 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I2400 Turbulent Flows

Origins of turbulence and the qualitative features of turbulent flow. Prandtl's mixing length theory, von Karman's similarity hypothesis, and entrainment theories. Calculations of the behavior of free turbulent flows, including jets, wakes and plumes. Calculations of bounded turbulent flows, including pipe flow and boundary layers. Turbulent dispersion and diffusion.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ME 35600 or CHE 34100.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I3200 Statistical Thermodynamics

An introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics; ensembles, partition function, relation to classical thermodynamics. Evaluation of thermodynamic and transport properties of dense gases and liquids from molecular theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ChE I2800 or ME I3300.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I4200 Continuum Mechanics

Continuum kinematics, formulation of physical principles in the continuum context, the formulation of constitutive equations, the theories of elastic solids, viscous fluids and viscoelastic solids. At the end of the course there will be an emphasis on either deformable porous media or finite deformation elasticity, depending on student interest.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Basic undergraduate courses in Mechanics of Materials, Fluid Mechanics and Linear Algebra (including vector field theory).

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I5200 Behavior of Inelastic Bodies and Structures

Linear theory of viscoelasticity with applications to vibrations and buckling. Introduction to the theory of plasticity. Physical basis, yield conditions. Perfectly plastic and strain hardening materials. Drucker's postulates, flow rule. Upper and lower bound theorems. Applications to torsion, indentation and plate theory. Numerical solutions.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CE I3500.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I6400 Wave Propagation in Fluids and Solids

Hyperbolic and dispersive, linear and non-linear waves. Hyperbolic waves: the wave equation, stationary waves, breaking waves, shock waves. Dispersive waves: dispersion relations, group and phase velocities. Non-linear waves and chaos in wave fields. Application to (1) water waves, (2) stress waves in solids (dilation and distortion waves, Rayleigh waves).

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100 or equivalent.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I7500 Poroelasticity

Incorporating elastic solid properties and Darcy's law, Biot poroelasticity is a model for interaction of stress and fluid flow in a porous medium. The Biot Model is used to solve quasistatic problems containing creep, stress relaxation and consolidation as well as wave propagation problems, including the "second sound" prediction and verification. The Biot model is then extended as a continuum mixture model suitable for a description of the mechano-electro-chemical behaviors associated with deformation and fluid flow in charged-hydrated porous materials. This mixture model provides a flexible and general basis that permits the development of a unified viewpoint for many diverse and perhaps simultaneously occurring phenomena.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1400: Applied partial differential equations and ENGR I4200: Continuum mechanics (or a course in elasticity and fluid mechanics that included viscous fluid theory).

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I9100 Mass Transfer

Definitions of concentrations, velocities and mass fluxes. Conservation of species equation; multicomponent diffusion; Stefan-Maxwell equations. Transient diffusion in semi-infinite media. Definition of transfer coefficients with mass addition. Application of film, penetration and boundary layer theory. Diffusion with homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reaction. Interphase transport.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I0800.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I9500 Professional Seminar and Special Topics in Earth Systems & Environmental Engineering

The Professional Seminar,which will be taught by a diverse group of faculty members, partners and other experts, will serve as a unifying foundation for the program by offering students a global perspective on environmental issues,introducing internship and research opportunities, and providing training in professional and personal skills.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Graduate student standing in ESEE. Permission of instructor

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR I9900 Final Project in ESEE

The final project will consist of a research project with a faculty member. ESEE students will have the opportunity to work on real environmental science and engineering projects to gain practical experience and, in some cases, hands-on experience in the field or research lab. The faculty member will work with the student to prepare a research proposal and conduct a 3-credit research project. Research proposals and final projects will be presented orally.

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR J0100 Fluid Dynamic Stability

Stability of two-dimensional incompressible boundary layer. Thermal instability. Stability of flow between rotating cylinders. Introduction to nonlinear instability. Applications to ionosphere and oceans.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR J3100 Irreversible Thermodynamics

An extension of classical thermodynamics to the treatment of irreversible processes. Entropy production. Forces and fluxes. Coupling of fluxes. Curie's principle. Reciprocal relations. Application to heat conduction, diffusion, momentum transfer, electrical conduction, chemical reaction, and their interaction.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I3200.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR J4000 Perturbation Techniques

The application of perturbation methods in the solution of solid mechanics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer problems. Formulation of the mathematical techniques in perturbation theory. Topics include: regular and singular problems, the method of strained coordinates, and matched asymptotic expansions. Applications to viscous flow at low and high Reynolds numbers, mechanical vibrations, and celestial mechanics problems.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGR I1100 and ENGR I0800.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.

ENGR J5000 Theory of Elasticity

Fundamental equations of the theory of elasticity. Uniqueness theorem. Formulation of torsion, flexure, plane stress and plane strain problems, and solution methods by means of complex variable and integral transforms. Three-dimensional problems. Displacement potentials and methods of Hankel transforms. Stress waves in solids.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CE I3500 or ME I5400 and ENGR I1100.

Contact Hours

3 hr./wk.